Festival Diary: Arnold Oceng

We spoke to Arnold Oceng at the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) about A United Kingdom, in which he appears alongside David Oyelowo and Rosamund Pike. What aspects of A United Kingdom do you think highlight contemporary society’s growth with respect to race since the time at which it is set as well as its invariance? The main aspect highlighted which shows growth in contemporary society in my view is that we as people are more diverse and multi-cultural, and this is mirrored and shown by the increase of people with mixed heritage and ethnicities. Seretse and Ruth embody true love and personify…

Festival Diary: Taron Egerton

We spoke to Taron Egerton at the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) about Sing, in which he appears alongside Scarlett Johansson, Matthew McConaughey & Reese Witherspoon. Sing features a failing theatre attempting to portray ‘real talent from real life’, what is a moment from real life that you felt made for a stronger performance? I forgot the words to a song on stage once. Still makes me shiver. Valuable lesson in being prepared! What do you think is the best (or your favourite) animated or voiced performance of all time? Toy Story had such a strong impression on me as a child.…

Festival Diary: Lyndsey Marshal

We spoke to Lyndsey Marshal at the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) about Trespass Against Us, in which she appears alongside Michael Fassbender and Brendan Gleeson. From what is available to research suggests, Trespass Against Us portrays the decline of a small-time crime family. Why do you think that the symbiosis of crime and family are so often so effective at commenting on one another in film? I think a family set up can provide you with a claustrophobic, pressure-cooker environment. You can see how an act of crime reverberates within a group. And how that effects individuals members and depending…

Festival Diary: Noel Clarke

We spoke to Noel Clarke at the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) about Brotherhood, which he directed, wrote, produced and starred in. With Brotherhood at TIFF, do you feel more pressure to promote yourself as an actor, director or as a writer? Do your personal inclinations gear you to present yourself more as a director? Actor? Writer? I don’t feel any pressure. I feel that sometimes because of the writing and directing that the acting gets ignored. Brotherhood is probably, bar Star Trek Into Darkness, my best film performance since Adulthood, 8 years ago. I do still see myself as an…